Arts Programme

Following the closure of Londonewcastles original project space in Shoreditch, after a successful eight years, the new and more intimate Gallery 46 has opened in Summer 2016.

 

We started our Arts Programme because we’re passionate about more than just property. Our aim: to bring London’s creative community and its vacant spaces together, giving new artists a place to showcase their work. If you are interested in exhibiting, please contact: info@londonewcastle.co.uk - Follow the Arts Programme by liking our Facebook page.
LN AD BEATRICE BROWN FINAL VERSION 997x662 - BEATRICE BROWN at Gallery 46

BEATRICE BROWN at Gallery 46

Produced on her kitchen table while her children slept, Beatrice Brown’s drawings are a...
LN Gallery46 27 09 2016 LowRes 11 580x326 - Gallery 46 - Whitechapel

Gallery 46 – Whitechapel

46 Ashfield Street, London, E1 2AJ

Gallery 46 in Whitechapel is our new sister gallery to be used as Londonewcastle Project Space. The new space, established through the partnership of Martin J Tickner and Sean McLusky and Fruitmachine founders, Martin Bell & Wai Hung Young breaks fresh ground for the open-source, non-conformist curatorial approach Tickner and McLusky employed at their (rightly) notorious MEN Gallery, in Shoreditch.Housed in a pair of newly renovated Georgian houses in the grounds of Whitechapel Hospital, GALLERY 46 is set over 3 floors and 8 rooms and is a kaleidoscopic addition to Whitechapel’s burgeoning gallery scene and close by its artistic...

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Street Art Programme

Shoreditch, London

Our Street Art Programme is about turning over large canvases on buildings under our control – during planning and development – to artists, from the internationally renowned to the completely unknown. If you’d like Londonewcastle to showcase your work, contact us...

Call me by my name: Stories From Calais and Beyond. The Migration Museum Project

Dates & Opening times: 2nd - 22nd June. 12pm-8pm daily. *12-5pm on 9th June* Transport: Overground (Shoreditch High Street- 2 min walk) Tube (Old Street/Liverpool Street-10 min walk) Bus (8, 23, 26, 35, 47, 48, 67, 149, 242, 388)

The Calais camp has become a potent symbol of Europe’s migration crisis. Public opinion on this ever- evolving shantytown and its inhabitants is polarised: to some a threatening swarm seeking entry to our already overstretched island-nation, to others a shameful symbol of our failed foreign policy. Amid such debate, it is easy to lose sight of the tens of thousands of individuals who have found themselves in limbo in Calais, each with their own story and reasons for wanting to reach Britain.

 

Call me by my name: stories from Calais and beyond is a ground-breaking multimedia exhibition, taking place in a momentous month that sees both the EU referendum and Refugee Week. It explores the complexity and human stories behind the current migration crisis, with a particular focus on the Calais camp.

 

The exhibition features compelling works by established and emerging artists, refugees, camp residents and volunteers. These include a powerful new installation by award-winning Danish artist Nikolaj Larsen, street art from Stik, drawings of the camp by illustrator Nick Ellwood, graffiti, art and photography by camp residents, and an installation of lifejackets embedded with the stories of their wearers. It will serve as a forum for a range of discussions, film screenings and performances, including a poetry evening hosted by Michael Rosen. There will also be an opportunity for visitors to leave their responses, which will become part of an art piece by artist-in-residence, Cedoux Kadima.

 

The Migration Museum Project would like to thank the following donors for their generous grants and support, without which we would not have been able to stage this exhibition: Londonewcastle, Arts Council England, ESRC, Open University, COMPAS and all of the generous contributors to our crowdfunding campaign.

 

Since opening on 2nd June the exhibit has already seen over 700 visitors and has been named pick of the week by Royal Academy of Arts review.

 

Featured image: The Red Carpet by Paul Evans